Ɂehdzo Got’ı̨nę Gots’ę́ Nákedı
Sahtú Renewable Resources Board

Folder 3.0 Relevant Documents

Documents

pdf Taking Care of Caribou - Sahtu Community Engagement Themes Table Popular

A lot of information was documented during community engagement in the Sahtú during 2009-2014 related to development of the Taking Care of Caribou Management Plan. It is included in the "We have been living with the caribou all our lives" community engagement report, along with that from all other regions. This information has also been isolated and is available as its own separate report from the Ɂehdzo Got'ı̨nę Gots'ę́ Nákedı. Here, a summary table is provided of the main messages or key themes that came up during the meetings in the Sahtú communities. Much more detailed information can be found either in the Community Report or in the report of Sahtu-specific information only. The Sahtu-specific report is posted in this Public Registry. The complete Community Report is online at http://srrb.nt.ca/index.php?option=com_docman&view=document&alias=978-sahtu-community-engagement-report-2009-2013-pdf&category_slug=barren-ground-caribou&Itemid=697.

pdf Taking Care of Caribou - Sahtú Community Engagement Compilation Popular

We have been living with the caribou all our lives” is a companion document to the Taking Care of Caribou Management Plan. It provides a record of the information that was recorded during the community engagement done to develop the Plan, and contains information from 17 communities and six different regions. This document is an abbreviated version of that report, and mostly contains information from the Sahtú Settlement Area. All other information can be found in the complete report, available online at http://srrb.nt.ca/index.php?option=com_docman&view=document&alias=978-sahtu-community-engagement-report-2009-2013-pdf&category_slug=barren-ground-caribou&Itemid=697.

pdf Taking Care of Caribou - Technical Report 15-02 Popular

One of two companion documents to Taking Care of Caribou: The Cape Bathurst, Bluenose-West and Bluenose-East Caribou Herds Management Plan. This report presents the recent scientific knowledge and status of these herd.  It also notes gaps in knowledge and research suggestions for consideration by the co-management boards responsible for the herds.

pdf TK of Barrenground Caribou Parlee-Thorpe 2013 Popular

A comprehensive documenting of the Traditional Knowledge of caribou in the Northwest Territories, including:

  • traditional names, ways of classifying and describing caribou
  • traditional knowlege of their range, distribution and population
  • traditional knowledge of their biology and behaviour, esp reproductive
  • observations about caribou habitat and ecosystem
  • threats to caribou
  • positive influences on caribou
  • observiations about the importance of hunting as a way of maintaining the conservation relationsip with caribou.

pdf WMAC-IGC Joint Letter - BNE harvest allocation 16-02-26 Popular

This is a joint submission from the Wildlife Management Advisory Council - NWT and Inuvialuit Game Council with a formal proposal for a Bluenose East caribou harvesting allocation. The proposal advocates a 2% harvest allocation for each of Inuvialuit, NWT Métis Nation, North Slave Métis Alliance, Akaitcho and Dehcho, for a total of 10% of the total allocation. The Sahtu, Tlicho and Kugluktuk (Nunavut) would share the remaining 90%. This proposal would lead to a 2.2% shift of ENR’s interim harvest allocation from the largest user groups; a shift that that the two parties feel is reasonable and fair. The proposal was met with support by most of the other user groups at the meeting.

pdf “We Live Here For Caribou” Tłı̨chǫ Cumulative Impacts Study on the Bathurst Caribou Popular

This study is based on the traditional knowledge (TK) of the people in Wekweètì, Northwest Territories. It
investigates the connection between people and the Bathurst caribou from three perspectives: 1) the
importance of caribou in the hunting economy, and thus as a foundation for maintaining the Tłıc̨ hǫ
culture, language and way of life; 2) cumulative impacts on t he h erd f rom a) the resource extraction
industry, b) commercial outfitting camps and c) disrespectful harvesting, and 3) the connection between
ecosystem and culture, and the co-dependent erosion of biological and cultural diversity. Lastly, the report
outlines several steps to resolve these issues.